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Unit 9 - Lesson 42 - Getting to know you

Remember

Expressing likes and dislikes
Describing people, places and things
Offering, accepting and refusing

Learn

To Like, To Look Like, To Be Like

The questions:-

What does he like?
What does he look like?
What would he like?
What is he like?
How is he?

What is the difference between these questions?

Check here!

Like

As a verb like can mean to enjoy or approve of.

For example:-

"I like your new car."

Like can also mean similar to or in the same way.

For example:-

Q. "What does he look like?" - A. "He looks like his brother."

The expression would like is used when we make requests and offers.

For example:-

"I' d like another glass of wine, please."

However "What is he/she/it like?" is a specific question about the personality of someone or the attributes of something, here you do not use like in the answer.

For example:-

Q. "What is he like?" - A. "He is very nice."

Q. "What is it like?" - A. "It is very reliable."


 

Some answers (about me):-

The question

What you would ask

My answer

 

What do I like to drink?

 

What do you like to drink?

I like tea and coffee, I also like wine and beer. I don't like alcopops.

 

What do I like to eat?

 

What do you like to eat?

I like pasta and pizza, I also like fruit. I don't like fatty meat.

 

What do I look like?

 

What do you look like?

I am medium height and a little overweight. I have long dark hair, a fair complexion and hazel eyes. Some people say that I am attractive, but I don't think I am.

 

Who do I look like?

 

Who do you look like?

Some people say I look like Nana Mouskouri. I don't think I do.

 

What am I like?

 

What are you like?

I think I am quite nice. My husband says that I am impatient, but I don't think I am. I think that I am very patient. A lot of people say that I have a good sense of humour.

What is my house like?

What is your house like?

It's quite small. It has a kitchen, bathroom, living room and two bedrooms.

 

!Note - Like is not normally used in the continuous form, you shouldn't say "I am liking ...".


More English Lessons

Next lesson - Lesson 43 Happy Families #1
Previous Lesson - Lesson 41 Travel and Transport

Test

Test what you have learnt - Enter the correct question

Practise Your English

 
This is a song that illustrates to be like.

Tell us about a friend of yours.

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You can read more corrections on the old forum.
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Week 42

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